Defined by What We Think is Cool

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Something I’ve noticed a lot lately is the need to broadcast what our interests are. This may apply more to the ‘geek culture’ but it’s now at the point that who you are and how you are perceived is defined by what you like and what you think is cool. 

 

In some ways, this isn’t a bad thing. If a person has a love for something, whether it’s a comic book character or even the current video game they’re playing, the need to share with the world the joys they are experiencing is natural. 

 

Where this becomes a problem is when the fabrication starts to take over. People will seek out or claim to have immersed themselves in something that they might not actually care for. It’s the need to be accepted by others that makes them feel this is what they have to do. 

 

Perhaps calling this a ‘problem’ is a bit much. There’s nothing wrong with taking what others are into and checking it out for themselves. It becomes unfortunate when you know what their true intentions are. Wanting to be accepted by others is a natural phenomenon. But the need to broadcast the fabricated interest over and over in the hopes of being accepted by others shouldn’t be what it’s about. The problem is when you can read between the lines and see what is really going on.

 

It might be that I still remember what our geek culture was like before Facebook, Twitter and the internet. I remember buying the latest Atari or NES games and reading the latest comics without telling everyone around what I was into. My status as a ‘cool person’ wasn’t defined by what I was reading or playing. Maybe that’s why I don’t always rush out to my iPhone to broadcast something I just read or if I managed to find 30 minutes to hop on my Xbox or PS3. I’d much rather use my time reading a comic or playing a good iPhone game rather than go on and on on a social platform about what I think is so cool to be doing.

 

Obviously due to my position in running a comic book website, I do need to share my thoughts on certain things. I just won’t give something praise because it’s supposedly the cool thing to do. I’ve been straight if I dig something or not. For example, I like enjoy 3D movies. They don’t bother me or give me a headache. I always thought the old school 3D comics were cool.  I didn’t absolute hate the Star Wars prequels. They don’t compare and are in a different class than the original trilogy but it’s ridiculous that liking them makes me less of a Star Wars fan.

 

Today’s fans are too focused about their social perception. For many, liking or not liking something in private doesn’t cut it. It’s unfortunate if groups of individuals can’t be liked unless they are interested in certain things. It’s really unfortunate if someone tries to give the impression they’re into something just to be accepted by others. I’m not going to say all Jim Carrey movies are great, just to get Jim Carrey fans to like me.

 

These days people are concerned with what their status is. How many people like their Facebook status or what their Klout score is. It’s great to be passionate about something but it’s not passion if you’re doing it just to impress others.

 

What it comes down to is people should like what they like and not worry if others don’t agree. It’s great to share a common interest with others but you don’t have to fake it in order to be liked by others. Let them like you for who you actually are. Otherwise you’re simply wearing a mask all the time. To me, that seems tiring. Just be yourself. Like what you like. Keep some things to yourself. You don’t have to tell the world everything just to get one more person to like you.

 

By the way, I saw the coolest sunrise this morning. Sunrises are cool. Everyone that digs sunrises should be friends with me.

 

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About Tony Guerrero

I'm the dude in charge of ComicVine.com.
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2 Responses to Defined by What We Think is Cool

  1. Ben Wagner says:

    Excellent post Tony!! I am the only comic book fan in my friend group, which is totally fine with me, and i do not play alot of video games as the rest of my friends. But we dont pretend to like what we dont, we are who we are and understand that we all have different likes.

  2. Mike Robichaux says:

    Right on.. I’ve been thinking about deleting my FB account altogether.

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